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  1. #1
    Senior Member bamabubba's Avatar
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    Lightbulb What do you guys think?

    I picked these two up at an antique shop this weekend. I figured $16 for the two of them wasn't bad. The both have busted scales and I'll have to redo them. One of the blades is in really good shape and is pretty darn shop (not shave-ready, but sharp). Neither has pitting but one does have a chip that'll require some bread knifing.

    The first is a Genco "Henry's Triumph." The etching is really faint so I'm afraid that I'll be losing it during restoration, but the metal is in too good a shape not to try.
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    The second is a John Lewis. It's stamped John Lewis Nashville, Tenn. Made in Germany
    On the otherside is stamped Excellence 85.
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    Any words of wisdom would be GREATLY appreciated!!!!
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Real Live Barber chay2K's Avatar
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    Those both look pretty good. If I were you, I wouldn't breadknife that Genco-- just tape the spine and work it out the old fashioned way. Just my cents. Let us know how they come out.
    "The ability to reason the un-reason which has afflicted my reason saps my ability to reason, so that I complain with good reason..."
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  3. #3
    Senior Member bamabubba's Avatar
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    Thanks! Looking at it now, that chip isn't all that bad. My problem is I can work wonders on a knife, but don't have the hones yet for razors...and with three younguns and a wife in grad school, probably won't for a while

  4. #4
    Some kind of Zombie BigJim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bamabubba View Post
    Thanks! Looking at it now, that chip isn't all that bad. My problem is I can work wonders on a knife, but don't have the hones yet for razors...and with three younguns and a wife in grad school, probably won't for a while
    Can't tell you whether to bread knife that blade or not, but a low grit stone 220 (which is what most tool/knife stones are) would be what you would want to use on the bulk of that blade...taking it down until the chip is ALMOST gone. In the mean time you can keep your eyes peeled for razor hones at antique shops and flea markets.

    Save your pennies and you can pick up a set of nortons piece-meal here: Lie-Nielsen Toolworks USA | Norton Waterstones You could spend less buying a package deal via peach tree or SRD, but it sounds like you're in a similar financial setting as I am, and so like me, maybe it'd be easier for you to pick hones up as you get the money for them.

    FWIW!

    Peace,

    P.S.>>>Dig the sig.

  5. #5
    Senior Moderator JimmyHAD's Avatar
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    If the chip ain't that bad 1 layer of tape and do circles until you've got it out. If you want to go faster do it like it was a pocket knife with the spine very slightly off of the stone until you're where you want to be and then do the 1 layer of electrical tape and proceed. The Norton 4/8 is reasonably priced and really all you need for regular honing and maintenance. For bevel setting with a restore like that a 1k is good to have.
    Be careful how you treat people on your way up, you may meet them again on your way back down.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Joe Edson's Avatar
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    agree with the others. Don't breadknife that Genco. Just tape up the spine and use a low grit hone to hone the chip out. If you don't have a hone you can get by with one 320 grit sandpaper taped or glued to a flat surface. Would need to take it to 1000 grit before going to the norton 4K/8K after that.

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