Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
Like Tree7Likes

Thread: Restoring a blade while preserving etching

  1. #11
    Member Str8Raz0r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    1,432
    Thanked: 641

    Default

    That etch looks fairly deep. You should get away with a light hand sand with some high grit wet and dry. Then a polish with some Maas or Mothers. JMHO.

    Stu

  2. #12
    Senior Member Str8Shooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    The Woodlands, Tx
    Posts
    1,912
    Thanked: 214

    Default

    For me if it were mine I would start with the least abrasive method. Mothers or MAAS. Should work great especially if you un pin it. If you start with something more aggressive you have a higher chance of losing the etch. Whenever I start a restore I'll use either black compound on a wheel or Maas. Plus if you un pin you can soak the scales in neetsfoot oil.
    Theseus likes this.
    "We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm."

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Str8Shooter For This Useful Post:

    engleson1 (05-26-2015)

  4. #13
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    13,952
    Thanked: 3304

    Default

    The thing most new restorers miss is what's happening at the bevel & immediately above it. Will you need to hone completely past the current bevel ? Will the steel above it support a new bevel.? Will the stabiliser become an issue if a lot of edge steel has to go ? It's advisable to at least try setting a bevel before any restoration or you may end up with a shiny letter opener. A magnified view of things really helps too.

    On this one it looks like there is rust in the bevel & a potential for the stabiliser to get in the way if that rust is deep enough to need a lot of honing.
    Last edited by onimaru55; 01-21-2012 at 12:42 AM.
    Theseus and Str8Shooter like this.
    Those in the room who believe in telekinesis, raise my hand.

  5. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    16
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Guys, thanks for all your input. I have some flitz polish, heavy duty paper towels, and high grit wet sandpaper. I'm going to so slowly.
    I thought about unpinning the razor, no doubt it would be easier, but I haven't yet acquired materials to repin the razor.

    Thanks again!

  6. #15
    Senior Member Str8Shooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    The Woodlands, Tx
    Posts
    1,912
    Thanked: 214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jwbharper View Post
    Guys, thanks for all your input. I have some flitz polish, heavy duty paper towels, and high grit wet sandpaper. I'm going to so slowly.
    I thought about unpinning the razor, no doubt it would be easier, but I haven't yet acquired materials to repin the razor.

    Thanks again!
    See how things go and if you run into problems and are in the states I'd be willing to take a look at it for ya. unpin, clean it up and repin. It's fun doing your own stuff though so remember to have fun.
    +1 to what ONI said.
    Paul
    "We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm."

  7. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    16
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    These are some pictures after the first evening on cleaning the blade. Again, I started with metal polish and then used some wet sandpaper with polish. However, I didn't use sand paper over the etching. The upper part of the etching seems to have faded a bit but perhaps it was always that way. I need another couple evenings to clean this up some more but I don't think I want to get it to a mirror finish. Retaining some of the evidence of its age I think will add to its character...at least in my eyes.
    I am curious about the etching on the tang. It says Joseph Allen & Sons/Sheffield. But on the top row it appears to says "ON [dot] XLL". XLL is 90 in roman numerals but "ON" are not roman numerals. Still researching what this line means.
    Shooter- thanks for the offer to take a look at my razor.

    Name:  IMG_8144.jpg
Views: 1254
Size:  19.6 KBName:  IMG_8146.jpg
Views: 1223
Size:  22.3 KBName:  IMG_8147.jpg
Views: 1244
Size:  17.3 KBName:  IMG_8148.jpg
Views: 1211
Size:  15.8 KBName:  IMG_8150.jpg
Views: 1226
Size:  18.4 KB

  8. #17
    Restorer, trader
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 1

    Default

    In my experience, if the "patina" (i call it all pitting) is below the level of the etch you wont have an etch after resurfacing.
    You get a calm mirror finish on a completely levelled resurface and a wavy on a "scooped" one, not much you can do... sanding off "King Cutter" would be devastating... but ....maybe it was never there .... hahah!

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Masque8802 For This Useful Post:

    MalShakespeare (02-01-2012)

  10. #18
    Senior Member osdset's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    London, United Kingdom.
    Posts
    227
    Thanked: 47

    Default

    ON.XLL? I think an 'N' has worn off at the beginning NON.XLL meaning 'none excel'

  11. #19
    aka shooter74743 ScottGoodman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    SE Oklahoma/NE Texas
    Posts
    6,467
    Thanked: 1470
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    I will be honest with you, that razro will never look new. Just clean it up to where you like it and either hone or have it honed. It's an old razor, let it be old & give you an experienced shave....
    Northeastern Texas & Southeastern Oklahoma Mentor/Helper...PM me if I can assist you.
    God Bless,
    Scott

  12. #20
    At this point in time... gssixgun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Sandpoint, Idaho
    Posts
    25,273
    Thanked: 12444
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    A True-isum of razor restoration...

    "The deepest pitting will inevitably be deeper than the etching/stamping.. The more valuable the etching and stamping is to the overall value of the razor, the deeper the pitting will be...

    Get over it and shave
    Zerandise likes this.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •